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Eating Yourself Sick: How to Stop Obesity, Fatty Liver, and Diabetes from Killing You and Your Family

Stop Eating Yourself Sick Take Control Of Your Health The United States will not be able to afford metabolic syndrome, a combination of disorders including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, elevated cholesterol and fatty liver― all of this is caused by poor eating habits. This could be a potentially fatal epidemic if not controlled, and most importantly, it can significantly impact the health of your children. If present trends continue, an American has a 57 percent chance of being obese at the age of thirty-five. So, what’s the solution? Joseph S. Galati, MD, has decades of experience researching and studying the effects of poor eating habits. After witnessing so many patients with metabolic syndrome, he wrote Eating Yourself Sick: How to Stop Obesity, Fatty Liver, and Diabetes from Killing You and Your Kids to raise awareness of the health issue that’s sweeping across the United States. In this book, you’ll learn: The symptoms and challenges of metabolic syndrome How family structure is critical to your physical well-being Different diets and food choices that can prevent and treat diseases The importance of exercise in the face of metabolic syndrome Now is a time to take charge of your well-being, whether you’re maintaining good health, or striving to achieve it. Dr. Galati seeks to give you the knowledge you need to defeat metabolic syndrome, and live a happy, healthy life.

Podcasts about Diabetes

podcast

Learn True Health: 267 Using Diet To Heal Disease, IBS, GERD, Gallbladder, Cancer, Candida, Diabetes, Insulin, Gluten, Keto, Kidneys

Genetics plays a significant role in determining if we’re healthy or not. We commonly think that diet and lifestyle are the answers to good health, but these are only two components of true health. Sarah Kostusiak, my guest today, has survived through a lot of health issues. So, we’re going to dive in today on how genetics is linked to our health. Early Years Sarah Kostusiak started to deal with blood sugar issues as early as five years old. Coping with it throughout her childhood, her health went from bad to worse when she got so sick in college. No doctor could pinpoint what was wrong with her. So, at 19 years old, Sarah Kostusiak started a food journal. She initially thought the red meat was the culprit. In an attempt to improve her health, Sarah Kostusiak went vegetarian for ten years. However, being a vegetarian increased her blood sugar issues. Looking back, Sarah Kostusiak felt that it was probably to gluten sensitivity. Fast forward years later, Sarah Kostusiak was also diagnosed with active reflux, GERD, and even had secondary infertility in 2010. After two kids, she ended up losing a pregnancy at 16 weeks. Finding A Cure Sarah Kostusiak realized that her body was tired, making it hard to heal. In an attempt to find a cure, she even went to a nutritionist who advised her to kick out gluten. Aside from that, Sarah Kostusiak also tried to eat fermented foods and adopted a paleo diet. But things weren’t improving. She got sick to the point that she couldn’t sit up. It was disempowering. That’s why Sarah Kostusiak remained determined to keep looking for a cure and vowed to use her knowledge to help others eventually. Discovering Genetics Sarah Kostusiak researched genetics and controlling blood sugar levels. This was during the time that she also dealt with a new health situation wherein she ended up having surgery to have her gallbladder taken out. “That was causing a level of inflammation in my body. I couldn’t control through food anymore because of gluten other factors. Top it off; I also had gallstones,” shares Sarah Kostusiak. Ongoing Health Issues Sixteen years before her surgery, Sarah Kostusiak says she was told that she had too much acid. So, she was also on acid blockers for a few years. “But I think food sensitivity, a lot of good biomes and digestive enzymes probably caused the inflammation in the gallbladder. Plus, I also had Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) issues,” said Sarah Kostusiak. That’s not all. Sarah Kostusiak also revealed that during this time, she started to have massive breakouts of acne on her face. Doctors then decided to put her on antibiotics for six months. “Looking back, when I eat gluten, my body gets a rash or zits. I increased my wheat consumption because I was avoiding meat. But I ended up with candida issues from the antibiotics. Then I had to deal with acid reflux,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Taking Out Gluten Sarah Kostusiak looked at her health history and worked backward. She said taking out gluten made a difference. “Candida is also caused when you eat yeast. Many gluten-free products aren’t healthy,” Sarah Kostusiak said. “I would still get health issues, but once I dug into my genetics and looked at my history, I even had to lay off fermented foods.” Genetic Testing For determining genetics, Sarah Kostusiak uses Ancestry DNA or 23andMe. But she prefers Ancestry DNA nowadays. Because apart from being able to download the data, Ancestry DNA can show you the which genes have a nutritional impact. “If they test my blood, it’s usually very high because I’m not processing it out. So I take methylated vitamins to support my body that way. And I also remove the histamine-rich foods,” reveals Sarah Kostusiak. Genes indeed play a significant role in health. I interviewed an author who wrote the book Dirty Genes. The author, Dr. Ben Lynch, talks about the different things you can do naturally to clean the genes, so your body run more efficiently. “Genetics can give me a clue on what your base. Epigenetics, environment, lifestyle, and diet affect genes. Not all genes can be affected epigenetically. Genetics is the key to see what’s going on in the body,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Current Diet Sarah Kostusiak has gone grain-free and leans towards a low-carb or ketogenic diet. This way, she can control her blood sugar levels. “I believe that blood sugar levels being high, leads to inflammation in the body. So, if I can control my insulin response, then I’m going to reduce my inflammation in my body,” said Sarah Kostusiak. She adds, “Supporting my body nutritionally and through supplements helps make me much more stable. I started to supplement my body with methylated b vitamins and folinic acid. Getting the sugar and grains out also helped improve my mental clarity, focus, and energy.” Keto Diet Sarah Kostusiak is working on a detox program now and is more into whole foods. She says it is also essential for her to make an effort to stick to a keto diet even on weekends. Mostly, she says you have to make mindset switch that this is your way of life. My husband and I had tried the keto diet for two and a half years before we shifted to paleo. I had had a low carb diet, took supplements and ate whole foods to reverse my type 2 diabetes. Grains and sugar are non-existent in my diet, and I stay away from corn aside from being gluten-free and dairy-free. But then we had extensive bloodwork done in January this year, and it was an eye-opener. Tests showed that our kidneys were damaged, as well as our liver and heart. That’s why my husband and I decided that it was time to stop doing the keto diet. “I eat fruits now. The keto has its healing effects and has its place in specific situations. Do the keto with a health coach or a Naturopath to monitor it. You can lose many pounds of muscle mass if done incorrectly,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Prostate Cancer Sarah Kostusiak has dealt with many patients who have prostate cancer. To prepare for surgery, she helps them lose weight to recover better after surgery. “Cancer ferments sugar for fuel. By removing the sugars and carbs, which converts to sugar in the body especially refined carbs, that makes someone a fat burner,” explains Sarah Kostusiak. She adds, “The body will then produce ketones. I can help the person by not encouraging any more growth of cancer. And make them feel better by creating ketones in their body to give them more energy and clarity.” Sarah Kostusiak usually monitors her clients every two weeks and checks on their muscle mass, body fat, and water weight. She discusses problems with them and looks at their macronutrients as well. Sarah Kostusiak monitors them once a month after that. Cause Of Prostate Cancer There are a lot of factors that cause cancer. Sarah Kostusiak says that toxin exposure like roundup is a significant factor. She also deals with clients with infertility issues which can sometimes be linked to the standard American diet. “Get sugars under control. A large belly is a sign of insulin resistance, and fat tends to be stored in the torso,” Sarah Kostusiak explains. “The fat cells not only hold fat. They hold hormones and toxins. Especially for men, those hormones can be released and convert testosterone to estrogen which can contribute to prostate cancer.” Intermittent Fasting Once Sarah Kostusiak sees there is progress in a client, she recommends them to go into keto. Because the next step is knowing how to get their protein at the right amount. She says people tend to overeat protein. So, protein levels have to be monitored. “I have some keto-vegetarian clients. My focus is to make sure they are getting protein. Because you need enough protein to protect your muscle mass. But too much is going to kick you out of ketosis, can convert to sugars and do the opposite things,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Sarah Kostusiak has genetic mutations which make her sensitive to proteins. If she watches her protein intake, she can lose weight. Otherwise, it would be hard to do so. Most of the time, Sarah Kostusiak gets her clients to eat a couple of hard-boiled eggs throughout the day. Their diet also includes some sources of nutritional yeast, protein powder, cottage cheese, paneer or Greek yogurt. Essentially, Sarah Kostusiak suggests that her clients go higher on the carbs. She says 45 to 50 grams of carbs will keep them in the fat burning zone. Diet Considerations Four years ago, Sarah Kostusiak went into premature menopause. She had metabolic syndrome, and her insulin was off the charts. But nobody believed she was having blood sugar problems because her tests would always be normal. Fortunately, her blood sugar levels are now ideal ever since she watches what she eats. “I am experimenting by adding fruit and rice to my diet. This way, I can gauge what can my body handle now that I reversed my insulin resistance,” Sarah Kostusiak said. She adds, “You can’t choose one diet. One diet isn’t going to last you your whole life. You must listen to your body. If you don’t listen to your hunger hormones, you’ll be in the same place as you were before.” Sarah Kostusiak also advises making sure you are getting the right food to supplement your body. Try different types of diet but do it with the help of a health coach. Sarah Kostusiak also eats cabbage at least once a week. She says the fiber rebuilds the gut bacteria. “Cut out different foods to see what foods you are sensitive to. Then re-introduce foods slowly. Watch the carbs and try to eat three to four cups of veggies daily,” said Sarah Kostusiak. “Listen to your body by cutting out dairy, grains, sugar, alcohol, and legumes. Then on days 31 to 45, introduce slowly again and see how your body reacts.” Being Present Stress is another common reason why our health is in bad shape. Apart from stress, Sarah Kostusiak advises that everyone must know where your food comes from. “Quality of food matters. Health is not just diet. Diet is just one part. Get enough sleep, take the right supplements for your body, look at the genetics and manage stress,” advises Sarah Kostusiak. She adds, “Histamine is a genetic component towards sleep. For example, wine keeps me awake. And that’s knowing my body. Be present and eat mindfully. Mind what is going on. Go for a walk, get a hobby, or do something with friends. Let work stay at work.” Sarah Kostusiak also suggests getting tested regularly. The organic acid test, in particular, is a urine test that can tell us compounds in the urine that are produced during daily metabolism. It can identify health issues like leaky gut, candida, mitochondrial issues and a lot of extra information. Shopping For Food Sarah Kostusiak says she doesn’t have time to follow a recipe. But generally, she tends to cook keto recipes at home. She knows her kids’ genes and how they react. Grains are allowed to be eaten whether they are out, but she mainly serves gluten-free dishes at home. Whenever she goes to the grocery, her list would usually include fresh produce, high-quality protein like chicken or turkey breast, and healthy fats like organic cheese, avocados, coconut oil, and avocado oil. And although she includes bacon in her list, she doesn’t do high fat. Life, Love And Thyme Blog Sarah Kostusiak’s blog is such a delight! It’s packed with a wealth of health information, diet tips, activities with kids and gardening. It’s been up for the past five years and is planning to put more recipes and videos on the blog so definitely check it out. Bio Sarah Kostusiak was born in Indianapolis, IN, but got to Texas as quickly as she could. She was a teacher for 14 years before staying home for nine years to raise her three children. Sarah Kostusiak spent her life being blown off by mainstream medicine because her symptoms didn’t fit their definition of disease. After years of struggling with IBS, GERD and Gallbladder issues she has discovered that a gluten sensitivity plus Candida are at the core of her health issues. In 2016, Sarah Kostusiak became a Certified Health Coach. She knew that there was a way to figure out her health issues and help others figure out theirs. Currently, she is working toward a Masters’ Degree in Health and Nutrition Education. Sarah Kostusiak believes that the key to health is the fuel you put into your body. She takes a holistic approach to health by looking at genetics, food sensitivities, blood markers and helping people learn to listen to their body. Sarah Kostusiak currently practices in Round Rock, TX where she sees clients of all ages. Her primary focus is helping people control their insulin response by showing them how to live a low carb lifestyle and reduce inflammation in the body. Get Connected With Sarah Kostusiak!

podcast

Myers Detox: Best Supplements for Diabetes with Michael McEvoy

Genetics plays a significant role in determining if we’re healthy or not. We commonly think that diet and lifestyle are the answers to good health, but these are only two components of true health. Sarah Kostusiak, my guest today, has survived through a lot of health issues. So, we’re going to dive in today on how genetics is linked to our health. Early Years Sarah Kostusiak started to deal with blood sugar issues as early as five years old. Coping with it throughout her childhood, her health went from bad to worse when she got so sick in college. No doctor could pinpoint what was wrong with her. So, at 19 years old, Sarah Kostusiak started a food journal. She initially thought the red meat was the culprit. In an attempt to improve her health, Sarah Kostusiak went vegetarian for ten years. However, being a vegetarian increased her blood sugar issues. Looking back, Sarah Kostusiak felt that it was probably to gluten sensitivity. Fast forward years later, Sarah Kostusiak was also diagnosed with active reflux, GERD, and even had secondary infertility in 2010. After two kids, she ended up losing a pregnancy at 16 weeks. Finding A Cure Sarah Kostusiak realized that her body was tired, making it hard to heal. In an attempt to find a cure, she even went to a nutritionist who advised her to kick out gluten. Aside from that, Sarah Kostusiak also tried to eat fermented foods and adopted a paleo diet. But things weren’t improving. She got sick to the point that she couldn’t sit up. It was disempowering. That’s why Sarah Kostusiak remained determined to keep looking for a cure and vowed to use her knowledge to help others eventually. Discovering Genetics Sarah Kostusiak researched genetics and controlling blood sugar levels. This was during the time that she also dealt with a new health situation wherein she ended up having surgery to have her gallbladder taken out. “That was causing a level of inflammation in my body. I couldn’t control through food anymore because of gluten other factors. Top it off; I also had gallstones,” shares Sarah Kostusiak. Ongoing Health Issues Sixteen years before her surgery, Sarah Kostusiak says she was told that she had too much acid. So, she was also on acid blockers for a few years. “But I think food sensitivity, a lot of good biomes and digestive enzymes probably caused the inflammation in the gallbladder. Plus, I also had Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) issues,” said Sarah Kostusiak. That’s not all. Sarah Kostusiak also revealed that during this time, she started to have massive breakouts of acne on her face. Doctors then decided to put her on antibiotics for six months. “Looking back, when I eat gluten, my body gets a rash or zits. I increased my wheat consumption because I was avoiding meat. But I ended up with candida issues from the antibiotics. Then I had to deal with acid reflux,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Taking Out Gluten Sarah Kostusiak looked at her health history and worked backward. She said taking out gluten made a difference. “Candida is also caused when you eat yeast. Many gluten-free products aren’t healthy,” Sarah Kostusiak said. “I would still get health issues, but once I dug into my genetics and looked at my history, I even had to lay off fermented foods.” Genetic Testing For determining genetics, Sarah Kostusiak uses Ancestry DNA or 23andMe. But she prefers Ancestry DNA nowadays. Because apart from being able to download the data, Ancestry DNA can show you the which genes have a nutritional impact. “If they test my blood, it’s usually very high because I’m not processing it out. So I take methylated vitamins to support my body that way. And I also remove the histamine-rich foods,” reveals Sarah Kostusiak. Genes indeed play a significant role in health. I interviewed an author who wrote the book Dirty Genes. The author, Dr. Ben Lynch, talks about the different things you can do naturally to clean the genes, so your body run more efficiently. “Genetics can give me a clue on what your base. Epigenetics, environment, lifestyle, and diet affect genes. Not all genes can be affected epigenetically. Genetics is the key to see what’s going on in the body,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Current Diet Sarah Kostusiak has gone grain-free and leans towards a low-carb or ketogenic diet. This way, she can control her blood sugar levels. “I believe that blood sugar levels being high, leads to inflammation in the body. So, if I can control my insulin response, then I’m going to reduce my inflammation in my body,” said Sarah Kostusiak. She adds, “Supporting my body nutritionally and through supplements helps make me much more stable. I started to supplement my body with methylated b vitamins and folinic acid. Getting the sugar and grains out also helped improve my mental clarity, focus, and energy.” Keto Diet Sarah Kostusiak is working on a detox program now and is more into whole foods. She says it is also essential for her to make an effort to stick to a keto diet even on weekends. Mostly, she says you have to make mindset switch that this is your way of life. My husband and I had tried the keto diet for two and a half years before we shifted to paleo. I had had a low carb diet, took supplements and ate whole foods to reverse my type 2 diabetes. Grains and sugar are non-existent in my diet, and I stay away from corn aside from being gluten-free and dairy-free. But then we had extensive bloodwork done in January this year, and it was an eye-opener. Tests showed that our kidneys were damaged, as well as our liver and heart. That’s why my husband and I decided that it was time to stop doing the keto diet. “I eat fruits now. The keto has its healing effects and has its place in specific situations. Do the keto with a health coach or a Naturopath to monitor it. You can lose many pounds of muscle mass if done incorrectly,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Prostate Cancer Sarah Kostusiak has dealt with many patients who have prostate cancer. To prepare for surgery, she helps them lose weight to recover better after surgery. “Cancer ferments sugar for fuel. By removing the sugars and carbs, which converts to sugar in the body especially refined carbs, that makes someone a fat burner,” explains Sarah Kostusiak. She adds, “The body will then produce ketones. I can help the person by not encouraging any more growth of cancer. And make them feel better by creating ketones in their body to give them more energy and clarity.” Sarah Kostusiak usually monitors her clients every two weeks and checks on their muscle mass, body fat, and water weight. She discusses problems with them and looks at their macronutrients as well. Sarah Kostusiak monitors them once a month after that. Cause Of Prostate Cancer There are a lot of factors that cause cancer. Sarah Kostusiak says that toxin exposure like roundup is a significant factor. She also deals with clients with infertility issues which can sometimes be linked to the standard American diet. “Get sugars under control. A large belly is a sign of insulin resistance, and fat tends to be stored in the torso,” Sarah Kostusiak explains. “The fat cells not only hold fat. They hold hormones and toxins. Especially for men, those hormones can be released and convert testosterone to estrogen which can contribute to prostate cancer.” Intermittent Fasting Once Sarah Kostusiak sees there is progress in a client, she recommends them to go into keto. Because the next step is knowing how to get their protein at the right amount. She says people tend to overeat protein. So, protein levels have to be monitored. “I have some keto-vegetarian clients. My focus is to make sure they are getting protein. Because you need enough protein to protect your muscle mass. But too much is going to kick you out of ketosis, can convert to sugars and do the opposite things,” said Sarah Kostusiak. Sarah Kostusiak has genetic mutations which make her sensitive to proteins. If she watches her protein intake, she can lose weight. Otherwise, it would be hard to do so. Most of the time, Sarah Kostusiak gets her clients to eat a couple of hard-boiled eggs throughout the day. Their diet also includes some sources of nutritional yeast, protein powder, cottage cheese, paneer or Greek yogurt. Essentially, Sarah Kostusiak suggests that her clients go higher on the carbs. She says 45 to 50 grams of carbs will keep them in the fat burning zone. Diet Considerations Four years ago, Sarah Kostusiak went into premature menopause. She had metabolic syndrome, and her insulin was off the charts. But nobody believed she was having blood sugar problems because her tests would always be normal. Fortunately, her blood sugar levels are now ideal ever since she watches what she eats. “I am experimenting by adding fruit and rice to my diet. This way, I can gauge what can my body handle now that I reversed my insulin resistance,” Sarah Kostusiak said. She adds, “You can’t choose one diet. One diet isn’t going to last you your whole life. You must listen to your body. If you don’t listen to your hunger hormones, you’ll be in the same place as you were before.” Sarah Kostusiak also advises making sure you are getting the right food to supplement your body. Try different types of diet but do it with the help of a health coach. Sarah Kostusiak also eats cabbage at least once a week. She says the fiber rebuilds the gut bacteria. “Cut out different foods to see what foods you are sensitive to. Then re-introduce foods slowly. Watch the carbs and try to eat three to four cups of veggies daily,” said Sarah Kostusiak. “Listen to your body by cutting out dairy, grains, sugar, alcohol, and legumes. Then on days 31 to 45, introduce slowly again and see how your body reacts.” Being Present Stress is another common reason why our health is in bad shape. Apart from stress, Sarah Kostusiak advises that everyone must know where your food comes from. “Quality of food matters. Health is not just diet. Diet is just one part. Get enough sleep, take the right supplements for your body, look at the genetics and manage stress,” advises Sarah Kostusiak. She adds, “Histamine is a genetic component towards sleep. For example, wine keeps me awake. And that’s knowing my body. Be present and eat mindfully. Mind what is going on. Go for a walk, get a hobby, or do something with friends. Let work stay at work.” Sarah Kostusiak also suggests getting tested regularly. The organic acid test, in particular, is a urine test that can tell us compounds in the urine that are produced during daily metabolism. It can identify health issues like leaky gut, candida, mitochondrial issues and a lot of extra information. Shopping For Food Sarah Kostusiak says she doesn’t have time to follow a recipe. But generally, she tends to cook keto recipes at home. She knows her kids’ genes and how they react. Grains are allowed to be eaten whether they are out, but she mainly serves gluten-free dishes at home. Whenever she goes to the grocery, her list would usually include fresh produce, high-quality protein like chicken or turkey breast, and healthy fats like organic cheese, avocados, coconut oil, and avocado oil. And although she includes bacon in her list, she doesn’t do high fat. Life, Love And Thyme Blog Sarah Kostusiak’s blog is such a delight! It’s packed with a wealth of health information, diet tips, activities with kids and gardening. It’s been up for the past five years and is planning to put more recipes and videos on the blog so definitely check it out. Bio Sarah Kostusiak was born in Indianapolis, IN, but got to Texas as quickly as she could. She was a teacher for 14 years before staying home for nine years to raise her three children. Sarah Kostusiak spent her life being blown off by mainstream medicine because her symptoms didn’t fit their definition of disease. After years of struggling with IBS, GERD and Gallbladder issues she has discovered that a gluten sensitivity plus Candida are at the core of her health issues. In 2016, Sarah Kostusiak became a Certified Health Coach. She knew that there was a way to figure out her health issues and help others figure out theirs. Currently, she is working toward a Masters’ Degree in Health and Nutrition Education. Sarah Kostusiak believes that the key to health is the fuel you put into your body. She takes a holistic approach to health by looking at genetics, food sensitivities, blood markers and helping people learn to listen to their body. Sarah Kostusiak currently practices in Round Rock, TX where she sees clients of all ages. Her primary focus is helping people control their insulin response by showing them how to live a low carb lifestyle and reduce inflammation in the body. Get Connected With Sarah Kostusiak!

podcast

Ben Greenfield Fitness: How To Reverse Type II Diabetes

Sami Inkinen is the CEO & Founder of San Francisco based Virta Health. Virta is an online specialty medical clinic that reverses type 2 diabetes safely and sustainably, without the risks, costs, or side effects of medications or surgery. Sami is also an active investor in companies advancing human health and performance as an angel investor and Venture Partner at Obvious Ventures. Previously, Sami was a co-founder, COO and President of Trulia until it’s IPO and eventual sale for $3.6B. Sami, an avid athlete, is a triathlon world champion in his age group, and recently rowed across the Pacific Ocean from California to Hawaii unsupported with his wife at a record speed to raise awareness about healthy nutrition. Sami received his Masters in Physics from the Helsinki University of Technology and MBA from Stanford University. The last time Sami and I spoke in the podcast How To Maximize Triathlon Success With Minimal Training Time, we discussed how Sami has a busy work life that only allows him a maximum of about 12 hours per week to train, and in that interview, he revealed his secrets, including: -What 99% of Ironman triathletes do wrong… -How a typical week of Sami’s triathlon training goes… -Sami’s top swim sessions and strategies (including the use of a swimming snorkel)… -How the combination of indoor cycling and a Computrainer can save you tons of time... -Sami’s top run workout on the track… -How Sami uses something called Restwise to track recovery, and what he really thinks about other training recovery tools… -What Sami eats and what he avoids eating… -And much more! Now Sami's back, and during our discussion, you'll discover: -The story of Sami's crazy low-carb rowing adventure to Hawaii, fueled by dehydrated vegetables, jerky and nuts...8:30 -What Sami's been up to with the creation of Virta Health...18:15 -How Virta Health works in a shockingly effective way to reverse Type II diabetes...26:45 -How Sami is quantifying his health, his sleep, his fitness and other lifestyle parameters...34:00 -What Sami's diet looks like now...42:30 -Dr. Steven Phinney's thoughts on the dangers of fasting...48:00 -The supplements Sami takes or does not take for maintaining a low-carb lifestyle, anti-aging and beyond...52:00

podcast

Learn True Health: Ashley James Tells Her Story of Healing Chronic Adrenal Fatigue, PCOS, Infertility, Fibromyalgia and Lyme Disease

Many of my listeners have been curious about my story of finding the cure for my various health conditions. Over the years, I have dealt with so much! So this time around, the tables have turned. I have onboard Jennifer Saltzman, a friend and Pilates instructor who I decided to give the honor of putting me on the hot seat for this podcast episode. My Backstory Jennifer Saltzman thought it was best that I start off this episode with my backstory. Well, ever since I could remember, I have always been a sickly child. I remember being a six-year-old first grader who constantly had a sore throat and clogged sinuses among others. It was indeed frustrating finding a cure for my health disorders. During that same time in the early 80s, my mother developed Candida. And because she was a workaholic, she tried finding a cure by taking medication to keep working. However, it seemed finding a cure was useless. She still suffered from fatigue, muscle weakness, and brain fog. In what seemed like a desperate attempt then to finding a cure, my mom eventually found a Naturopath. That doctor told us that my mother and I both had blood type O. No big deal, right? Wrong. That same doctor dropped the bomb by announcing that apparently, I was allergic to milk, yeast, wheat, and sugar! My Parents My mother was my best friend. She read all these articles on antioxidants. On our quest to finding a cure for our health conditions, we went to acupuncturists together. We even enjoyed the services of a massage therapist who would come to our house once a week. My dad, on the other hand, had his health challenges. Because he primarily had weight issues, I did a bunch of diets with him, too. And oh, how he loved eating out! However, even if he loved eating meat, his meals were always dairy-free, grain-free and gluten-free. My parents were both A-types. They were both headstrong. My mother, in particular, had an air of elegant grace. She turned heads and held her ground with such authority. Furthermore, she was excellent in integrating self-care into her life. Shifting To A Whole Foods Diet When the Naturopathic doctor first declared that I was allergic to so many things, it didn't quite sink in the first time. At six years old, I had no idea that the revelation would change my life. All I cared about was whether I could still eat my favorite Coffee Crisp chocolate bars. I told Jennifer Saltzman that I remember going home that day with my mom carrying a bunch of powder supplements from that doctor. It was also the same day that my mom got rid of all the "bad foods" and switched to a whole foods diet. Yes, it was drastic but looking back, it was incredible how my health changed so much in just a span of a few days. We even switched to soy milk during those times when it was still GMO-free. "I was symptom-free. It was like heaven! All we had to do was eat a whole foods diet, void of processed foods and take supplements." Right from the time my mother put me on a whole foods diet, I was hardly sick from six years old until I became a teenager. However, when I turned 13, I decided to rebel by eating candy and cafeteria food. As expected, I lost my health and spent the next few years finding a cure to get my health back. Then when I was 19 years old, I was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome. Early on, the doctors told me I would never have kids. Spending most of my adult life without a feminine cycle, I gradually developed other diseases along the way. Getting Married I'm now 37 years old and have been married for nine years. My husband knew that I couldn't have kids, but that didn't stop us from trying. Then the unexpected happened. "We went through the first six years without medical intervention. However, when we discovered supplements and a healthy way of eating, we got pregnant on our first attempt!" We're now parents of a very healthy baby boy, and we couldn't be any happier. Not only did we prove doctors wrong, but eating right really does make a significant difference. "Taking more digestive enzymes made my pregnancy so much easier. Naturopathic medicine or Homeopathic medicine is so powerful. It does work." Coping With Diseases Looking back, I had a roller coaster of diseases I battled with over the years. I also kept gaining weight year after year. It baffled me because I was athletic when I was growing up. However, I think all that started to change when my mom passed away of liver cancer when I was 22 years old. It was a dark time in my life, and I was depressed for a few years. It was so bad that shortly after my mom's death, I was diagnosed with hypoglycemia and type 2 diabetes. "Depression doesn't want to make you take care of yourself. I ended up making a lot of bad choices and developed chronic adrenal fatigue. I drank a lot of coffee, and I also developed chronic infections." Moving To The United States When I first moved to the United States years ago, things didn't get any better. My health deteriorated even faster because I was also juggling many responsibilities with my job as a manager. When I eventually met my husband, Duffy, I found it funny that he and I are allergic to almost the same foods. And would you believe, I'm allergic to bananas? Surprising but true! My husband had arthritis, high blood pressure, and blood sugar issues. I, on the other hand, was primarily struggling with weight issues. By that time, I had already tried over 32 diets, but none of them worked. Aha Moment My aha moment came one day when my husband and I were watching a health documentary. It was around 2008 or 2009. Anyway, that documentary had such a tremendous impact that my husband and I decided to try shifting to an organic foods diet. "Taking on the organic foods challenge for a month, I didn't get sick. I even stopped taking antibiotics. In short, I felt amazing!" The Power Of Supplements Now that my husband and I got on the right path with eating organic or whole foods, we also discovered the benefits of taking supplements. It may seem costly at first, but it pays off in the long run. "My blood sugar was so unstable that I felt like a prisoner of my own body. So I started drinking liquid minerals. My blood sugar began to balance within a few hours of taking supplements, and my energy level was high within five days." Eventually healing from diabetes and high blood pressure, I diminished the need to eat all the time. Hence, our food budget went down. Saving a monthly average of 300 dollars, my husband and I allotted that amount for our supplements. "Doctors wanted to give me more medication to manage the side effects. But I took myself off medicines. I would rather live with the original symptoms I had than living with the side effects of drugs." Learn True Health Podcast Overcoming all those diseases and healing from them inspired me to share my story with other people. And because I found ways to empower myself in being healthy, I felt the need to share my knowledge on a bigger scale. My husband knew that I loved podcasts and encouraged me to launch one. Hence, the Learn True Health podcast was born. "It's pretty life changing when your life goes from being very dysfunctional to optimized. It's such an incredible blessing." This concludes Part 1 of this two-part series. Please link to episode 180 for Part 2 where I delve into issues like healing heartburn, 12 fad foods that deteriorate health and more on how I healed from my health conditions. See you in the next episode!

podcast

The Curbsiders Internal Medicine: Diabetes A1C targets and guidelines controversy

Get schooled on hemoglobin a1c targets in type 2 diabetes mellitus by American College of Physicians guidelines coauthor, Devan Kansagara MD MCR, Associate Professor of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University. We summarize outcomes from the landmark diabetes trials (ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, UKPDS 33 & 34), how a1c targets effect microvascular and macrovascular events, estimating life expectancy, and how to personalize diabetes control for your patients. We’re proud to announce our new partnership with the ACP to provide free CME credit and MOC points on select episodes of The Curbsiders. ACP members can visit acponline.org to redeem free CME/MOC credit. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast Join our mailing list to receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written, produced, and edited by: Matthew Watto MD. Hosts: Stuart Brigham MD, Paul Williams MD, Matthew Watto MD. Guest: Devan Kansagara MD, MCR Time Stamps 00:00 Announcement 00:48 Disclaimer and intro 03:11 Getting to know our guest: one liner, book recommendation, mentorship 06:50 How and why did ACP write their guidance statement on diabetes, A1C targets 09:18 Landmark trials in type 2 diabetes 11:36 Does tight control prevent micro or macrovascular complications 13:20 Trials of newer agents like SGLT2i, GLP-1 and DPP4i 14:33 How do ACP’s guidelines differ from other published guidelines 17:20 Quick recap of landmark trial findings 22:24 Personalizing glycemic control 24:30 Controversy over an A1C goal of 7-8% 28:05 Clinical inertia 30:26 Legacy effect and metabolic memory 34:00 Deintensifying therapy 38:29 Life expectancy and comorbid conditions 43:15 Performance measures in diabetes 44:42 Take-home points 46:30 The Curbsiders recap and give some closing remarks 49:13 Outro Tags: diabetes, a1c, target, dm, hypoglycemia, glycemic, intensive, tight, glucose, control, cardiovascular, risk, outcome, mortality, death, metformin, insulin, acp, guideline, accord, advance, vadt, ukpds, microvascular, macrovascular, aace, ada, VA, DoD, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

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