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Prebiotics

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Prebiotics and probiotics sound like cousins, but they actually play very different roles in the digestive system. Specifically, prebiotics aren’t bacteria; they’re food for bacteria. You wouldn’t want to introduce good bacteria into your body without a way to feed them, right? Even if you’re not taking probiotics, prebiotics also help increase the beneficial bacteria already in the gut, which results in improved digestive health, immunity, and more. You can introduce prebiotics to your system with supplements, but you can also get prebiotics through foods like beans, peas, bananas, berries, garlics, chicory root, and leeks. If those aren’t typically foods you reach for, supplements are a good way to ensure that you’re getting enough prebiotic love. The good news is that people with chronic GI issues, from the mild to the severe, say they’ve experienced huge improvements when taking prebiotics.

Videos about Prebiotics

Books about Prebiotics

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The Probiotics Revolution: The Definitive Guide to Safe, Natural Health Solutions Using Probiotic and Prebiotic Foods and Supplements

If the thought of bacteria conjures images of germs that should be avoided at all costs—and certainly not ingested—think again! Some friendly bacteria, called probiotics, are not only beneficial to your health, they’re essential. Now an internationally recognized scientist at a top U.S. medical school—one of the leading researchers in the field—sheds light on the extraordinary benefits of these natural health superstars. Thanks to an explosion of research in recent years, one thing is clear: probiotics, the healthy bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract, are the body’s silent partners for good health, optimizing the power of the immune system to fight disease and the “bad” germs we fear. But how do they work? And in the face of factors like stress and poor diet, which decrease their numbers, how do you keep your supply well stocked? Here is an up-to-the-minute, highly accessible guide to probiotics and the foods and supplements that contain and support them—many of which may be in your diet already. Discover: The key role of probiotics and prebiotics in restoring healthy balance to our bodies, improving immune system functioning, and curbing inflammation How to use probiotic foods and supplements to prevent and relieve allergies, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, yeast infections, and the negative side effects of antibiotic use New evidence that probiotics may help fight asthma, cardiovascular disease, breast and colon cancer, autoimmune diseases, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia—and even obesity Natural sources of prebiotics, the nutrients that help make the digestive tract more hospitable for probiotic bacteria The Probiotics Revolution also includes a step-by-step plan for incorporating the many food sources of probiotics and prebiotics into your diet, a complete buyer’s guide to probiotic supplements, and how to introduce probiotics to your family and children.

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The Complete Prebiotic and Probiotic Health Guide: A Vegetarian Plan for Balancing Your Gut Flora

In recent years, there has been a great deal of research exploring the relationship between maintaining an optimal balance of healthy bacteria in our gut, known as "healthy gut", and the impact of a healthy gut on overall health and disease prevention and treatment. There are two bacteria key to a healthy gut: probiotics and prebiotics. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that naturally live and flourish in the colon of our digestive systems. Prebiotics, on the other hand, are non-digestible carbohydrates that also live in the digestive system where they act as "food" for the beneficial probiotics. Unfortunately, there are some lifestyle choices, such as poor diet and overuse of antibiotics, that can seriously compromise healthy levels of probiotics and prebiotics. The Complete Prebiotic and Probiotic Health Guide is a guide to achieving and maintaining an optimal balance of prebiotics and probiotics in the digestive system. Written by one of North America's leading gastroenterologists, the book explains what and exactly how probiotics work, as well as how they are linked to diseases like inflammatory bowel disease and urinary tract infections. The health benefits of prebiotics are also covered and their role in diseases such as colon cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, weight loss and calcium absorption. To get you off to the best possible start with respect to both prebiotics and probiotics, The Complete Prebiotic and Probiotic Health Guide has 175 tempting recipes that promote optimum amounts of each. Foods like yogurt, kefr, sauerkraut and miso soup are covered for their positive probiotic benefts, and such foods as asparagus, chicory root, garlic, onions, and dietary fiber, which optimize prebiotics, are also covered. This is a comprehensive and practical choice for making important changes that can have a profound effect on health and well-being.

Podcasts about Prebiotics

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